I love this quote because it reminds me that it does not matter how old you are. Throughout my 365-day RV tour of the USA, I’ve played to crowds from ages 1-99 and played with musicians ages 18-91 (literally, I played a show with a 91-year old vibraphone player, Harry Sheppard, in Houston, Texas). It’s so, so wonderful how music can cross these types of boundaries. It’s easy to get caught up in ageism with social media and the pop charts showing younger demographics, but remember: There are people out here of all ages, shapes, and sizes creating and sharing their music. And it’s never too late to pick up that guitar and start singing.

I’m happy you think it sounds varied! Of course, I’ve been freaking out for awhile about the exact opposite; when I listen I of course hear a lot of similar patterns, progressions and melodies, which worries me a bit. Ultimately, I try to maintain a sort of “been there, done that” mentality to writing new music, meaning that if I find myself venturing into too-familiar territory I look for ways to steer myself towards a new direction.

If you’d like to work with any of these artists specifically, just let us know via this form. We’re happy to connect you with a mentor for a phone call before you make any commitments to the program. Take a free preview to learn more about how the program works, or to be matched with a mentor right away.

Art supplies grants

From a South American dance to a romantically rubato performance piece, Bach’s Violin Partita in D minor has some funky rhythms and bizarre chromaticism!

What’s the one thing (or three or four!) that you do that nobody else does? Describe your band, give a brief history about your work, and highlight your accomplishments. If you don’t have any successes yet, then your goal should be to get your foot in the door of a small local venue, or play in your friends’ living rooms and backyards and set up cameras to capture the show, or do whatever you can to get out there on the circuit. Then build momentum from there.

Sometimes, I’ll mention “I Wanna Dance With Somebody” and someone in the room will just start singing the chorus immediately. Part of that has to do with this melodic context stuff and the tonal hierarchy of certain notes that dominate that section, but it also has to do with other stuff like lyrical repetition in the chorus, tonal resolution, the rhythm and meter, and even with personal memories we might attribute to that song. Cognitive science can explain a portion of this, but not all of it, as Cui is sure to mention.

Funnily enough, the biggest breakthrough came with our approach. We are dealing with music here, not 1s and 0s, so we made the early decision to not trust the data. We engineered the user experience and worked our way back to the data. When we were faced with a problem, we looked at music theory and DJing to solve the user experience rather than rely on what the data was telling us.

As I mentioned before, streaming services ingest about 20,000 new songs every single day, and the classification of those songs is still a manual process. We can accurately classify all songs before they are ingested into a music catalog so that they can be part of the recommendation and discovery algorithms immediately. More importantly, we can identify duplicate songs, erroneous artist profiles, and many other things.

Cultural and historical endowment

The Cardigans’ “Lovefool”’ is one of my favorite songs of all time. It features such a fun bass line, and you can’t help but sing along to that top-line. But the lyrics are begging someone to love them back. All of Lizzo’s lyrics are about her not giving a f*#k about someone loving her back because all that matters is that she loves herself. That’s a message that resonates with me more now for sure.

And all of this happened before Brown’s future mega hits like “Sex Machine,” “Papa’s Got a Brand New Bag,” and “It’s a Man’s Man’s Man’s World” were even conceived. Live at the Apollo paved the way for Brown’s later successes, it was a jumping off point to reaching the black audiences and households to whom he really wanted to communicate. At this point, Brown was playing around 300 shows a year but was still mostly known by black audiences.

You’ll probably be asked to stick to a short set time of between 20 and 30 minutes. Create a tight set of songs that showcases your music and creates some kind of momentum, and don’t play covers unless you’ve specifically cleared it with the venue. Some music venues aren’t legally set up for their bands to perform covers.

We love psychologist Anders Ericsson’s concept of “deliberate practice.” It describes an approach to learning in which we focus our activities on the areas that need the most work, steadily pushing ourselves to the edge of our comfort zone (you can read more about the science behind this method here). As learners, this kind of work can be tough to do because we often don’t know what we need to do next to improve.

I have been improvising with instruments for 25 years now, in many different idioms: blues, rock, jazz, country, and various kinds of electronic music. Scratching is very different from playing an instrument. Intellectually scratching is something like playing loops in Ableton Live’s Session View, but it’s more like playing an instrument, while triggering loops is more like composing.